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The Great Resignation: A Discussion with Colgate Alumni and Faculty - Shared screen with speaker view
RICHARD VAN DEVENTER
21:47
from my perspective, the big drivers for resignations are more opportunity to work from home and also professional labor shortages are driving meaningfully higher comp.
GARY TRAUNER
25:36
First, per St; Louis Fed,here was an excess of over 2.4 million people retiring from expected and the long term trend line. So part of it is lots of boomers leaving the workforce "early" for various reasons. Second, I agree that its more of a great reshuffling to better jobs - higher wages, more certainty in scheduling, etc.
Rob Smith
25:59
With this labor shortage are more companies willing to consider 65 years old employees who are not ready to retire for another 5 or 7 years?
Brett Brewster
27:34
Our expertise is around building safe / trusted communities at organizations through shared interests and it’s an interesting new way to onboard employees too. If you can introduce a new employee right away into several interests groups and an onboarding groups it goes a long way.
Meredith Chavel
28:36
Another Colorado resident here - what we have seen is we could previously recruit based on the quality of life in Colorado. Now, we are competing against companies all over the country - with remote, everyone can offer that quality of life.
Sarah Lange
31:09
I'm a consultant for nonprofits, many of those folks HAVE to be in the office to help their clients, so the rate of burn out is increasing.
RICHARD VAN DEVENTER
32:54
Professional I.T. folks are demanding hybrid work environments. We have to be flexible in order to keep and retain qualified people.
Sarah Lange
34:46
I left my job as an adjunct because teaching on line felt super disconnected for me.
Elise Bronzo
38:39
More flexibility leads to more creative, innovative and meaningful work. Totally agree with Kanitha.
Meredith Chavel
44:29
Interested to hear how Colgate is preparing students to be professionals that may never go into an office - how to network remotely, etc.
Sarah Lange
48:45
What I've seen is that women, people of color & folks of low-income status have been worst hit -- they either HAD to work, or lost their jobs (and couldn't afford to), and at the same time were the most vulnerable, due to social determinants of health.
Elspeth Monigle
52:50
I've found that junior/new to the workforce employees are struggling in the absence of in-person work. They're less familiar with office dynamics, when to ask questions, how to work with superiors, etc. It's harder to learn without environmental cues.
Sarah Lange
54:14
@Elspeth - excellent point! 70% of communication is non-verbal. Hard to pick up on cues when you can only see people from the chest up!
Brett Brewster
54:56
New hires are losing the ability to “shadow” their fellow employees and managers when new to an organization
Sarah Lange
55:16
@Brett - yeah, I hadn't thought of that. Good point.
Jane Anderson
56:30
John makes a really great point. I manage a global team who will never be in the office at the same time and these changes have been tremendously impactful to staying connected virtually.
Sarah Lange
01:04:20
AWESOME!!!
Jaime Bruck
01:07:25
Thank you! This was great.